What happened during the Montgomery bus boycott in 1956?

The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a civil rights protest during which African Americans refused to ride city buses in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest segregated seating. The boycott took place from December 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scale U.S. demonstration against segregation.

Why was the Montgomery bus boycott important?

Lasting 381 days, the Montgomery Bus Boycott resulted in the Supreme Court ruling segregation on public buses unconstitutional. A significant play towards civil rights and transit equity, the Montgomery Bus Boycott helped eliminate early barriers to transportation access.

What happened December 20th 1956?

On Dec. 20, 1956 a federal ruling declared the Alabama laws requiring segregated buses to be unconstitutional. African Americans boarding an integrated bus following the Supreme Court ruling, a result of the successful 381-day boycott of segregated buses.

How was the Montgomery Bus Boycott successful?

Martin Luther King, Jr., a Baptist minister who endorsed nonviolent civil disobedience, emerged as leader of the Boycott. Following a November 1956 ruling by the Supreme Court that segregation on public buses was unconstitutional, the bus boycott ended successfully. It had lasted 381 days.

How did Martin Luther King help the Montgomery Bus Boycott?

Martin Luther King, Jr., a Baptist minister who endorsed nonviolent civil disobedience, emerged as leader of the Boycott. Following a November 1956 ruling by the Supreme Court that segregation on public buses was unconstitutional, the bus boycott ended successfully.

What was the end result of the Montgomery Bus Boycott?

Sparked by the arrest of Rosa Parks on 1 December 1955, the Montgomery bus boycott was a 13-month mass protest that ended with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that segregation on public buses is unconstitutional.

Is Claudette Colvin still alive today?

However, now she’s 82 and a resident of Birmingham. She’s lived her life under probation from those charges she accrued as a teenager, and they have never been never lifted. Colvin would move to New York City and worked as a nurse’s aide.