What is the most prominent symptom of frontotemporal dementia?

The most common signs of frontotemporal dementia involve extreme changes in behavior and personality. These include: Increasingly inappropriate social behavior. Loss of empathy and other interpersonal skills, such as having sensitivity to another’s feelings.

What are the signs and symptoms of frontotemporal dementia?

What are the symptoms of frontotemporal dementia?

  • Behavior and/or dramatic personality changes, such as swearing, stealing, increased interest in sex, or a deterioration in personal hygiene habits.
  • Socially inappropriate, impulsive, or repetitive behaviors.
  • Impaired judgment.
  • Apathy.
  • Lack of empathy.
  • Decreased self awareness.

What are the last stages of frontotemporal dementia?

In later stages, patients develop movement disorders such as unsteadiness, rigidity, slowness, twitches, muscle weakness or difficulty swallowing. Some patients develop Lou Gherig’s disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). People in the final stages of FTD cannot care for themselves.

How quickly does frontotemporal dementia progress?

Most cases are diagnosed in people aged 45-65, although it can also affect younger or older people. Like other types of dementia, frontotemporal dementia tends to develop slowly and get gradually worse over several years.

What is a typical age of onset of the symptoms of frontotemporal dementia?

Behavior variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is characterized by prominent changes in personality and behavior that often occur in people in their 50s and 60s, but can develop as early as their 20s or as late as their 80s.

How do you slow down frontotemporal dementia?

Frontotemporal dementia is a neurodegenerative condition that tends to strike people between the ages of 45 and 65. Researchers say lifestyle changes can reduce a younger adult’s risk of getting this disease. Experts recommend moderate physical exercise, mental games such as puzzles, and quality sleep.

How can I help someone with frontotemporal dementia?

Be a part of finding better treatments

  1. Get regular health care.
  2. Ask family and friends for help with child care, errands, and other tasks.
  3. Spend time doing enjoyable activities, away from the demands of caregiving.
  4. Join a support group for caregivers of people with FTDs.

What is a common treatment for frontotemporal dementia?

Medications. Antidepressants. Some types of antidepressants, such as trazodone, may reduce the behavioral problems associated with frontotemporal dementia. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) — such as citalopram (Celexa), paroxetine (Paxil) or sertraline (Zoloft) — also have been effective in some people.

What medication is used for frontal lobe dementia?

Antidepressants. Some types of antidepressants, such as trazodone, may reduce the behavioral problems associated with frontotemporal dementia. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) — such as citalopram (Celexa), paroxetine (Paxil) or sertraline (Zoloft) — also have been effective in some people.

Who gets frontotemporal dementia?

Frontotemporal dementia affects the front and sides of the brain (the frontal and temporal lobes). Dementia mostly affects people over 65, but frontotemporal dementia tends to start at a younger age. Most cases are diagnosed in people aged 45-65, although it can also affect younger or older people.

What is frontal lobe dementia?

Frontal lobe dementia, also known as frontotemporal dementia, is a form of dementia that occurs when the frontal lobes of the brain begin to shrink (o Menu FIND DEMENTIA CARE OUR BLOG

How does frontotemporal dementia affect the brain?

In frontotemporal dementia, the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain shrink. In addition, certain substances accumulate in the brain. What causes these changes is usually unknown. There are genetic mutations that have been linked to frontotemporal dementia.

Is there a cure for frontal lobe dementia?

Today’s approaches to frontal lobe dementia are palliative, meaning they are focused on easing symptoms, as there is no known cure for frontal lobe dementia or treatments that can delay its progression. The disease inevitably gets worse and in its final stages patients require 24 hour care.

Can frontal lobe dementia be misdiagnosed as a mental illness?

Because the personality changes associate with frontal lobe dementia are so pronounced, it is sometimes initially misdiagnosed as mental illness. Frontal lobe dementia does not cause memory loss, but it can other cognitive and neurological problems similar to those caused by Alzheimer’s disease or stroke.